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Convection Articles


Skin-Friction and Forced Convection from an Isothermal Rough Plate

Aubrey G. Jaffer

Abstract

Presented are new correlations for skin-friction and forced convection from an isothermal plate having root-mean-squared height-of-roughness εq. Corresponding to Prandtl and Schlichting's "fully-developed roughness" region, the skin-friction correlation is independent of Reynolds number; the convection correlation is a linear function of Reynolds number (versus an exponent of 4/5 for turbulent convection from a smooth plate).

fc = 1
16 [log10(ε/L)]2
Nu = Re Pr1/3
32 [log10(ε/L)]2

Measurements taken of a plate having precisely 3 mm of roughness match the convection correlation within 3% at Reynolds numbers from 5000 to 50000. A formula addressing the transition from fully-rough turbulent to smooth turbulent convection for this bi-level test plate matches those measurements within 2% from Re=5000 to 80000.

Convection measurements of a bi-level plate having 1.03 mm of roughness are within the expected measurement uncertainties of the transition formula.

An analysis of sand-roughness finds that its relation to root-mean-squared height-of-roughness is non-linear. The resulting scale error explains discrepancies between the Prandtl and Schlichting formula, two recent papers, and the results presented here.

These new correlations and measurements imply a threefold tighter upper bound for the height of admissible-roughness than is given in Schlichting's book Boundary-layer theory.

Full Article

Skin-Friction and Forced Convection from an Isothermal Rough Plate


Turbulent Mixed Convection from an Isothermal Plate

Aubrey G. Jaffer

Abstract

Mixed convection is the combined transfer of heat from a surface having simultaneous externally forced flow and buoyancy generated (natural) flow.

For horizontal and vertical rectangular (smooth) plates and flows (parallel to the plate), there are 14 combinations of orientation and laminar and turbulent forced and natural flows. Including rough-turbulent forced flows raises the number of combinations to 23.

By excluding laminar forced convection, mixed convection can be modeled as a function of the natural and forced convective surface conductances and orientation of the plate and flow. Furthermore, such mixed convection is bounded by the L4-norm and L2-norm of the forced and natural convective surface conductances per each orientation.

Systematic measurements at Reynolds numbers from 2500 to 20000 of the 10 combinations of horizontal or vertical orientation and laminar natural flow mixed with turbulent and rough-turbulent forced flows were made in air using 0.305 m square heated plates having 3.0 mm and 1.03 mm RMS height-of-roughness. The formula presented here matches nearly all the measurements within their expected uncertainties.

In addition to the measurements made at horizontal and vertical orientations, measurements of buoyancy-aided and buoyancy-opposed mixed flows made at a plate angle of 84.5° (nearly face down) also match the generalized formula within expected uncertainties.

Full Article

Turbulent Mixed Convection from an Isothermal Plate

Supplementary Data

In the temperature versus time graphs in the supplementary files, the green, blue, and black traces are the plate, (insulated) back, and ambient temperatures respectively. The upper red trace is a simulation of the plate temperature with the back and average ambient temperatures as inputs. The middle red trace is a simulation of the back temperature with the plate and ambient temperatures as inputs. The lower red line is the ambient temperature averaged over the measurement period.

The diamonds on the plate temperature trace mark the beginning and end of the measurement period, the ending temperature difference with ambient being at most half of the peak temperature difference with ambient. The simulated plate temperature is reset to the real plate temperature at the first diamond.

Underneath each temperature graph is a graph of the air velocity versus time for mixed convection runs and Rayleigh number versus time for natural convection runs.

Natural Convection
natural.pdfNatural Convection at a dozen Rayleigh numbers in vertical and horizontal orientations.
angles.pdfNatural Convection at angles from −90 to +90
Mixed Convection
mixed-up.pdf3mm roughness face up; horizontal forced flow
mixed-up.pdf1mm roughness face up; horizontal forced flow
mixed-aid.pdf3mm roughness face vertical; upward forced flow
mixed-aid.pdf1mm roughness face vertical; upward forced flow
mixed-vt.pdf3mm roughness face vertical; horizontal forced flow
mixed-vt.pdf1mm roughness face vertical; horizontal forced flow
mixed-opp.pdf3mm roughness face vertical; downward forced flow
mixed-opp.pdf1mm roughness face vertical; downward forced flow
mixed-dn.pdf3mm roughness face down; horizontal forced flow
mixed-dn.pdf1mm roughness face down; horizontal forced flow
mixed-aid+84.pdf1mm roughness face down inclined aiding +84.5°
mixed-opp+85.pdf1mm roughness face down inclined opposing +84.5°
Zip of Supplementary Files
supplementary.zipZip Archive of All Files

Convection Measurement Apparatus and Methodology

Aubrey G. Jaffer

Abstract

Presented are the design and operating methodology of an apparatus constructed to make accurate measurements of mixed convection at all horizontal and vertical orientations of an isothermal plate with forced airflow in the plane of the plate.

The measurements from this Convection Machine drove the development and validation of a comprehensive theory of turbulent mixed convection from a rectangular plate having at least one horizontal edge.

Full Article

Convection Measurement Apparatus and Methodology



Combined Bibliography

Copyright © 2016, 2017, 2018 Aubrey Jaffer

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